News Archives for: January 2004

Donkey Konga Expansion Pak Announced
Posted on January 29, 2004 @ 12:00 AM EST by: TW
The latest issue of Japan's Famitsu magazine contains a nice, quiet little surprise for Nintendo fans. Located at the bottom of the GameCube release date list in the back of the magazine is a title with the tentative name of "Donkey Konga Disk 2."

Of course, it can probably be assumed that this is an expansion disk to the original Donkey Konga featuring new songs and other features.
The release list lists the game as a year 2004 release in Japan. We expect a more formal announcement shortly.

Source: Cube IGN

NPD Data Reveals Nintendo #1 in Several Categories
Posted on January 22, 2004 @ 12:00 AM EST by: TW
If awards were handed out today for the stars of the video game industry in 2003, Nintendo would walk home with an armful more than any other company. According to independent retail sales data just released by NPD Funworld, Nintendo was named No. 1 in the following categories by the nation's game players:

No. 1 Selling System: Game Boy® Advance, with 8.1 million sold in 2003


No. 1 Fastest-Growing System: Nintendo GameCube™, with a 40 percent unit sales increase over 2002 (compared to a 25 percent decline for Sony's PlayStation 2, and flat sales for Microsoft's Xbox)


No. 1 Fastest-Growing Game Seller: Nintendo GameCube, with a 77 percent unit sales increase over 2002


No. 1 Hit Maker: Four of the year's top seven sellers played only on Nintendo (Pokémon® Ruby and Pokémon® Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; The Legend of Zelda®: The Wind Waker™ and Mario Kart®: Double Dash!!™ for Nintendo GameCube)


No. 1 Sales Growth: Corporate retail revenues increased 16 percent over 2002


No. 1 Landmark: Game Boy Advance just sold its 20 millionth system in America!

Source: Nintendo

Nintendo Announces Dual-Screened Portable Game System
Posted on January 21, 2004 @ 12:03 PM EST by: Hairball
An unprecedented approach to video game play —holding two separate game screens in the palm of your hand — hits the scene later this year when Nintendo introduces a new portable game system, code-named Nintendo DS.

From information made available today, players can look forward to being able to manage their game progress from two different perspectives, enhancing both the speed and strategy of the challenge. For example in a soccer game, users can view the whole game on one screen while simultaneously focusing on an individual soccer player's tackle or goal on the other screen.

Players will no longer be forced to interrupt game play to shift perspective, such as moving from a wide shot to a close up, or alternating between a character's ongoing battle and a map of the environment. Nintendo DS makes it possible to perform the tasks in real time by simply glancing from one screen to the other.

Today's announcement is but a glimpse of the additional features and benefits that will be shown in full at the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) in Los Angeles in May. Once fully revealed, players will see innovative advances in game interaction.

"We have developed Nintendo DS based upon a completely different concept from existing game devices in order to provide players with a unique entertainment experience for the 21st century," explains Satoru Iwata, Nintendo president.

Nintendo DS features two separate 3-inch TFT LCD display panels, separate processors, and semiconductor memory of up to 1 Gigabit. It's scheduled to launch worldwide before the end of 2004.

In addition to Nintendo-developed software, the company is in discussions with third-party game developers around the world.

Nintendo DS will be marketed separately from the company's existing Nintendo Game Boy® Advance portable system and Nintendo GameCube™ home console.

The worldwide leader and innovator in the creation of interactive entertainment, Nintendo Co., Ltd., of Kyoto, Japan, manufactures and markets hardware and software for its popular home and portable video game systems. Each year, hundreds of all-new titles for the best-selling Game Boy® Advance and Nintendo GameCube™ systems extend Nintendo's vast game library and continue the tradition of delivering a rich, diverse mix of quality video games for players of all ages. Since the release of its first home video game system in 1983, Nintendo has sold more than 1.8 billion video games globally, creating enduring industry icons such as Mario™ and Donkey Kong® and launching popular culture franchise phenomena such as Metroid™, Zelda™ and Pokémon®. A wholly owned subsidiary, Nintendo of America Inc., based in Redmond, Wash., serves as headquarters for Nintendo's operations in the Western Hemisphere.

For more information about Nintendo, visit the company's Web site at www.nintendo.com.

Source: Nintendo

Nintendo Sales Skyrocket in the U.S. and Around the World
Posted on January 15, 2004 @ 5:39 PM EST by: Hairball
Nintendo GameCube: the Only Home Console with Positive Growth in 2003

REDMOND, Wash., Jan. 15, 2004 – Around the world and around the block, Nintendo has taken a leadership position in the video game industry. Hardware and software sales in 2003 made significant leaps over 2002, and Nintendo's success bumped Microsoft's Xbox to the No. 3 position in the 2003 console wars.

Global holiday sales for Nintendo GameCube™ in 2003 outpaced 2002 by a whopping 70 percent, and Nintendo does not plan to change its global sales target of 6 million Nintendo GameCube systems this fiscal year.

Nintendo estimates for 2003, Nintendo GameCube U.S. hardware sales increased by more than 35 percent over 2002; Sony's PlayStation 2 dropped by about 25 percent and Xbox showed no relevant market growth. In December alone, Nintendo GameCube hardware sales soared 69 percent over December 2002, compared to a drop of about 30 percent for PlayStation 2. Again, Xbox showed little change.

U.S. sales got a boost from a Sept. 25 price drop, which brought Nintendo GameCube to an MSRP of $99.99. Now Nintendo GameCube has nearly 6.8 million units sold in the U.S. since its 2001 launch. And Mario Kart®: Double Dash!!™ has become the fastest-selling Nintendo GameCube game in the United States, selling more than 1 million units in just seven weeks.

"With the price drop for Nintendo GameCube and strong games across the board, we expected to have a good holiday season, but these numbers surpassed even our best projections," explains George Harrison, Nintendo of America's senior vice president of marketing and corporate communications. "Nintendo GameCube and Game Boy Advance have become the engines powering the video game industry this year."

The hand-held Game Boy® Advance also saw double-digit increases in the United States, with nearly 2.5 million units sold in December, an 11 percent increase over December 2002. Nintendo sold more than 8.2 million Game Boy Advance systems in 2003, an increase of 18 percent over 2002 and the most sold in one calendar year in the 14-year history of the Game Boy. In 2003, the Game Boy Advance outsold PlayStation 2 by nearly 2 million units.

Nintendo also led the way during the holiday season's software boom. The 2003 sales for Nintendo GameCube software increased 63 percent over 2002, while Xbox software increased 54 percent and PlayStation 2 software increased 23 percent. Nintendo expects to continue riding the wave of success through 2004, with a steady flow of strong software titles, including Final Fantasy®: Crystal Chronicles™ in February and Pokémon Colosseum™ in March.

The worldwide leader and innovator in the creation of interactive entertainment, Nintendo Co., Ltd., of Kyoto, Japan, manufactures and markets hardware and software for its popular home and portable video game systems. Each year, hundreds of all-new titles for the best-selling Game Boy® Advance and Nintendo GameCube™ systems extend Nintendo's vast game library and continue the tradition of delivering a rich, diverse mix of quality video games for players of all ages. Since the release of its first home video game system in 1983, Nintendo has sold more than 1.8 billion video games globally, creating enduring industry icons such as Mario™ and Donkey Kong® and launching popular culture franchise phenomena such as Metroid®, Zelda™ and Pokémon®. A wholly owned subsidiary, Nintendo of America Inc., based in Redmond, Wash., serves as headquarters for Nintendo's operations in the Western Hemisphere.

For more information about Nintendo, visit the company's Web site at www.nintendo.com.

Super Mario Bros & Other NES Classics on GBA (again)
Posted on January 14, 2004 @ 10:11 AM EST by: TW
Nintendo Japan today announced that it will release the Famicom Edition Game Boy Advance SP to stores. For 12,500 yen (about $117), gamers will be able to snag the system on February 14th, 2004, packed with Super Mario Bros., the original Famicom/Nintendo Entertainment System version emulated for the Game Boy Advance.

The company originally created the Famicom Edition Game Boy Advance SP as a limited edition prize for members of Club Nintendo in Japan. The retail version will be slightly altered from the original version created for this contest.

The company also revealed the Famicom Mini series of games for the Game Boy Advance. Starting February 14, for 2,000 yen (about $19) gamers will be able to pick up GBA versions of original Famicom (NES) titles, packaged in unique, micro-sized boxes.

Games currently announced include:

From Nintendo:

Super Mario Bros.
Donkey Kong
Ice Climbers
Excite Bike
Legend of Zelda

From Third Party publishers:

Pac-Man
Xevious
Mappy
Bomberman
Star Soldier

More on the way. No announcement on a US version of this system or the Famicom Mini cartridges.

Source:IGN.com

Do you know what the Game Boy should be called?
Posted on January 8, 2004 @ 4:36 PM EST by: Hairball
Nintendo seems to care a lot about what it's called, although this seems to apply more to their corporate partners rather than the consumers, but here's their press release posted on the media website:

Did you know that there are ways to actually misuse a Game Boy? We just did it in the last sentence. Our famous Game Boy® trademark is sometimes misused. When a trademark is repeatedly misused it risks becoming a generic word that does not indicate the source or quality of the product.

You are probably one of more than 160 million people who love their Game Boy video game systems. But no matter how you use it (Gameboy, GameBoy, game boy, gameboy), real portable fun is actually spelled:

• Game Boy® system
• Game Boy® Advance hardware
• Game Boy® Advance SP hardware

(Game Boy® can be used as an adjective to modify many generic nouns like system, video game system, hardware, game, software, accessory and so on.)

Now for some plural fun:

When there's more than one Game Boy®, Game Boy® Advance or Game Boy® Advance SP system, trademarks should never be used in plural format.

Here are some examples:

Incorrect usage:

• Game Boys
• Game Boy Advance SPs

Correct usage:

• Game Boy systems
• Game Boy Advance SP hardware

Of course, our trademark Game Boy® should never be used to refer to a non-Nintendo video game system. Our competitors have to earn their own reputations. Please don't give them a free ride on ours.